Children’s Dental Restorations

pediatric dentist Fishers

There is more than one way to fix a child’s tooth. Whether it’s decay or a crack, we have a restoration option.

Today’s message looks at three pediatric tooth restoration procedures we provide to repair a damaged tooth:

1. Dental Bonding

Bonding, officially called direct composite veneers, is used to correct chips, cracks, stains, and make teeth longer. It is also sometimes used to fill cavities. Your dentist applies a pliable composite resin and molds it to the exact shape necessary. The resin is then hardened with a special curing light.

2. A Filling (Inlay or Onlay)

A traditional filling is shaped and molded after it is applied to the tooth. Because inlays and onlays are constructed in a dental lab, they are typically called indirect fillings. Inlays are applied to just the center of the biting surface of a tooth (not to a cusp or point) and are ordinarily smaller than onlays. An onlay restores one or more cusps of a tooth.

3. A Dental Crown

A crown replaces the entire visible portion of the tooth, restoring appearance, strength, and function. Crowns are used for teeth that have had a root canal, teeth with extreme decay, or the replacement tooth in a dental bridge. Crowns can be made of all metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, all-ceramic, or all resin.

It’s critical to restore both primary and permanent teeth. If your child has a cavity or damaged tooth, don’t delay treatment.

For more information about any of these options, call Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS at 317-842-2337.

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 8165
Posted in Dental Crowns, Restorative Dentistry, Root canals

What’s Your Dental Emergency Plan?

A LITTLE BIT OF PREP work makes a huge difference when an emergency happens, including a dental emergency such as an oral injury. What exactly can we do to prepare for something like an unexpected injury? It depends on the specific situation.

Broken Tooth

If an injury results in a broken, chipped, or cracked tooth, the best thing to do is head straight to the dentist. If you can find the broken pieces, bring them along in a glass of cold milk to protect them. It’s also okay to rinse your mouth with water.

Even if a crack or chip seems minor, don’t ignore it! If the damage reaches the pulp chamber, it puts the tooth in serious danger of infection. Even if it doesn’t, it can work like a cavity and give bacteria a space to grow until it does reach the pulp chamber. That’s how dental infections start, leading to pulp death, painful abscesses, loss of bone tissue in the jaw, and even the risk of the infection spreading to the bloodstream.

Knocked Out Adult Tooth

If the whole tooth gets knocked out in one piece, this, too, is a situation that requires immediate attention from the dentist. There is a limited window (not much longer than an hour) in which a knocked out tooth can be successfully replanted, so the faster you get to the dentist, the better its chances are. To give it its best shot, put it back in the socket on the way there and hold it in place with a washcloth or gauze. If that isn’t possible, store it in cold milk.

Here are a few important don’ts for knocked out teeth:

  • DON’T touch the root.
  • DON’T let it dry out.
  • DON’T scrub or clean it with soap, alcohol, or peroxide.

Any of these could kill the root, making the tooth impossible to replant.

Knocked Out Baby Tooth

Most of the time, when a baby tooth gets knocked out, it isn’t an emergency. Typically we wouldn’t replant a baby tooth because that might create problems for the permanent tooth underneath. However, if it wasn’t loose beforehand, we recommend at least giving the dentist a call for some advice. There might be less obvious damage than what happened to the tooth.

We’re Prepared for Patient Emergencies Too!

Another essential part of your dental emergency plan, besides what to do in different emergency situations, is to know where to go for help! If you’d like to learn what our practice can do for dental emergencies, just give us a call and we can tell you about our end of the equation. Hopefully you’ll never need to make use of this information and the only times we’ll see you will be for normal appointments, but preparation is key!

Thank you for putting your trust in our practice!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

What is the Recovery Time for a Dental Implant?

dental implant recovery time Fishers

What is the recovery time for a tooth implant procedure?

There isn’t a standard timeline because there are many variables involved.

Each patient’s treatment plan is unique.

Here are some considerations that affect the recovery time for a dental implant procedure.

  1. Is a tooth extraction needed?
  2. Will I need to have a bone graft (and/or sinus lift) before getting the implant?
  3. Will I receive anesthesia during the procedure?

Tooth extraction

If you need a non-viable tooth pulled, it may be possible to receive a permanent dental implant on the same day. As long as you have enough strong, healthy jawbone in which to anchor the implant.

Bone graft

As soon as a tooth is taken out, the bone begins to recede. A dental implant is the only tooth replacement procedure that prevents or (greatly reduces) bone deterioration.

If teeth at the implant site have been gone for a while, the bone may have receded. Bone can also be weakened or destroyed with a severe infection.

A key determination is whether an implant patient needs bone augmentation.

In a bone grafting procedure, an oral surgeon or dentist packs bone material into the area where the implant will be placed.

If the implant will be placed in the upper arch, you may need a sinus lift treatment. When bone matter recedes in parts of the upper jaw, it may cause the floor of the sinus cavity to fall into the space created.

A sinus lift procedure is done in conjunction with a bone graft. The goal is to raise the floor of the sinus cavity to make room for the additional bone material.

After the bone graft, you need to wait until the new bone has meshed with the existing bone. This will create a strong and stable foundation for the implant.

Recovery after a bone graft procedure

Day of procedure: Though bone grafting requires oral surgery, don’t let the term “surgery” give the impression that it has a long recovery time. The site will be sore, but most patients can take care of it with Ibuprofen or aspirin.

It doesn’t take much longer than filling a cavity. Most patients can return to work the next day.

If swelling or pain increases a few days after the procedure, contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS.

After a bone graft, how long until I can get my implant?

The fusing process can take several months. You don’t want to rush this because successful implantation requires a sturdy foundation.

Recovery after implant placement

Just as with the bone graft procedure, the implant placement procedure can be completed in less than two hours. If you elect to have IV sedation, however, you will need to wait until the effects of the sedation have worn off.

You will probably experience the following post-procedure:

  • Pain at the implant site
  • Minimal bleeding
  • Swelling and/or bruising of the gums and cheeks

These effects should subside after a few days. Ice packs used on the outside of the face can reduce swelling. Call our office if these symptoms persist.

NOTE: It is not necessary for a permanent dental implant recipient to be unconscious for dental treatment. A local painkiller is usually sufficient. However, people with dental anxiety may elect stronger sedation.

Healing abutment

Your dentist may affix a temporary healing abutment to the post during the initial surgery. A healing abutment is sometimes described as a ‘healing cuff’ or ‘healing cap.’

Make sure you practice proper oral hygiene but be extra careful when cleaning around the surgical site.

It’s vital to follow all post-procedure instructions. And be sure to make the recommended follow-up visits.

Smoking can make it harder to heal from any type of oral surgery.

After a permanent dental implant has had time to fuse with the bone, you will have an appointment to attach the abutment.

Attaching the abutment

This is a fairly quick and easy treatment. Your dentist will make an incision in your gum tissue at the implant site to expose the post. Then the abutment is attached. Your dentist may place the prosthesis (artificial tooth crown, dental bridge, or denture/partial denture) at the same time. Or your dentist may wait until your gums have healed.

Permanent dental implants can give you a beautiful new smile. To keep it beautiful and avoid further dilemmas (like decay or an infection):

  • Practice proper oral hygiene—keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy
  • Eat a nutritious diet
  • Don’t chew on hard foods or other items
  • If you grind your teeth, obtain treatment.
  • Have a twice-yearly dental exam and cleaning

At Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS in Fishers, we restore missing teeth with dental implants. Dental implant placement studies have found a five-year success rate of 98%.

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 8243
Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry, Dental Implants, Restorative Dentistry

How Medicine and Oral Health Intersect

WE ALL KNOW that medications can have side effects. If you tried, you could probably hear the voice in pharmaceutical commercials rattling off some of the most common ones in your head. We bring it up because those side effects often include oral health problems.

Medicine and the Chemistry of the Mouth

Some of the medications and even vitamins we take can be directly harmful to teeth. This is more of a problem for children, since adult medicine mostly comes in the form of pills to be swallowed. Medicine for children, on the other hand, often takes the form of sugary syrups and multivitamins. That sugar feeds oral bacteria and can contribute to tooth decay.

Adults and children alike may experience oral side effects from inhalers — particularly oral thrush, or white patches of fungus on the tongue, the roof of the mouth, and inside the cheeks, which can be irritating or painful. A key preventative measure for patients who use inhalers is to rinse with water after using the inhaler (also a good idea after taking cough syrup or multivitamins).

The Indirect Impact of Medicine on Oral Health

Even if a medication makes it past the mouth without causing direct harm, those side effects can still kick in later. For example, blood thinners can make the gums more prone to bleeding while brushing. A number of medications can cause inflammation in gum tissue, increasing the risk of gum disease.

While this may not be an actual health concern, several medications can affect our sense of taste, causing a weird bitter or metallic taste or other changes. There have been rare instances of drugs for osteoporosis compromising the bone tissue in the jaw, which increases the risk of gum recession and tooth loss.

Dry mouth is the most common oral side effect of prescribed and over-the-counter medications alike. Dry mouth, in addition to making chewing and swallowing difficult and reducing the ability to taste, leaves the teeth and gums vulnerable. Saliva is the first line of defense against oral bacteria, and without it, it’s much harder to defend against gum disease and tooth decay.

Keep the Dentist in the Loop

Make sure you know about the side effects of any medications you may be taking, and make sure your dentist knows too! It may be possible to adjust a prescription to minimize the negatives, but that can only happen if all health care professionals involved are properly informed of your situation.

Dentists are a wonderful resource, so make sure to use them!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

How Oral Inflammation Affects Your Health

inflamed gums Fishers

Swollen and painful gums are symptoms of periodontal disease, an inflammatory gum disease. Swelling occurs from an auto-immune response of the body reacting to an infection. Infections are noticeable through pain, redness, and warmth. If the infection is left untreated, it can affect the bone near the teeth. The body’s immune system wants to rid the bone of the dangerous material the bacteria is creating. Over time, bone loss will occur.

Inflammation in the gums also is associated with atherosclerosis, the occurrence of fatty deposits inside of the body’s arteries. Inflammation coincides with an increase of the blood protein CRP (C-reactive protein), produced by the liver. The more inflammation there is, the more the liver produces CRP. The more CRP present, the more likely cardiovascular disease is present, along with related issues. CRP production is also related to arthritis, auto-immune disorders, and intestinal issues.

Scientists are currently looking into the relationship between periodontal inflammation and CRP level and the effects outside of the oral cavity. Links have already been discovered between periodontal disease and pancreatic cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

If inflammation is left untreated, gums can develop pockets that provide the perfect breeding ground for infection. The longer the infection persists, the more likely bone loss will develop, eventually causing tooth loss.

It is indispensable to practice preventive dental care daily at home and have regular visits to the dentist. Dental appointments should include an exam, cleaning, and full mouth x-rays, along with the important knowledge and instruction on how to properly care for teeth and gums at home. It is also very important to see your dentist promptly if a tooth suddenly becomes sensitive or you observe any other changes.

Thanks for visiting our blog. For more specifics about inflammation or periodontal disease, give us a call at 317-842-2337.

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 7095
Posted in Family Dentistry, Gum disease, Pediatric, Uncategorized

A Brief History of False Teeth

AN ESTIMATED 23 MILLION Americans have none of their teeth left, and another 12 million are missing all the teeth of one arch. As dental health professionals, we do our part to help those numbers go down, but that’s still quite a few people who need replacement teeth. There’s a long and fascinating history that got false teeth to where they are today.

Ancient False Teeth

False teeth have been a solution for tooth loss since at least 2500 B.C. The oldest examples we know of were discovered in Mexico and made of wolf teeth. Nearly two thousand years later, the ancient Etruscans were using gold wire or bands to attach human or animal teeth to a person’s remaining teeth, and the tomb of El Gigel in Egypt contained two false teeth made of bone and wrapped in gold wire.

The Last Few Centuries of Dentures

Bringing things into the modern age, the Japanese began using wood as a material for false teeth in the 1500s, but carved ivory became a popular material by the 1700s. Ivory turners, goldsmiths, and barber-surgeons would craft dentures out of ivory, human teeth, and animal teeth.

Guess Who Didn’t Have Wooden Dentures?

Even though wood was used as a denture material in some places, George Washington’s mouth was not one of them. Thanks to a combination of a poorly balanced diet and (likely) genetics, Washington suffered a lifetime of dental problems, losing a tooth a year starting in his twenties. By the time he was inaugurated, he only had one tooth left!

Washington’s dentist, Dr. John Greenwood, made several sets of dentures for the first president, and they were pretty advanced for the time. He made them out of hippo ivory, gold springs, and brass screws attached to human teeth. As good as Greenwood was at his job, Washington still experienced a lot of pain with them and was very insecure about the way they made his face look.

A cool detail about Dr. Greenwood is that, where most of his contemporaries probably would’ve pulled Washington’s remaining tooth, he carefully crafted the dentures to accommodate it, for he believed that a dentist should “never extract a tooth…[when] there is a possibility of saving it.” Greenwood would be in good company today!

False Teeth Today

Here in the 21st century, patients have far better options than George Washington did. Modern dentures are usually made of acrylic resin or plastic, and sometimes porcelain. They are available as partial dentures or full sets, and they can be removable or anchored in place by implants. Implants can also serve as anchors for orthodontic treatment.

Patients can even have each missing tooth replaced by an individual implant, though this is a very expensive option. Better yet, more and more teeth can be saved through root canal treatment, meaning that a replacement tooth isn’t needed at all!

Good Strategies for Keeping Our Teeth

As far as false teeth have come over the course of history, we’d all prefer to keep our teeth and keep them healthy. Going to our regular dental appointments, avoiding sugary foods and drinks, and maintaining good daily dental hygiene routines are all essential components of keeping our teeth healthy and strong for life!

We love our patients’ healthy smiles!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

Why It’s Crucial To Replace Missing Back Teeth

dental implants Fishers

Some men and women who lose a posterior tooth question whether to replace it. After all, it doesn’t show when you smile and there are other teeth to take over the chewing functions. Why not avoid the expense to replace it and save some money? Actually, there are several critical reasons to replace a back tooth with a permanent tooth implant if possible:

1. The adjacent tooth (or teeth) may start shifting.

If tooth tips, moves or rotates, it can impact the bite. The unopposed tooth can also move, though it generally moves outward from the bone (over-eruption). Teeth that are displaced can become more vulnerable to gum disease, decay, or TMJ pain.

2. The underlying bone will eventually recede.

Without the tooth root, the jaw bone pulls back. This changes the dimensions of the face and gives it a sunk-in look due to a reduction in supporting bone. The vertical shortening progresses and becomes more pronounced as you get older.

3. There will be extra stress on the teeth that take over the chewing functions.

This can lead to excessive wear, fracture, or pain.

If you have a missing posterior tooth and want to learn about dental implants, call Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS at 317-842-2337 to schedule an appointment.

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 7455
Posted in Dental Implants, General Dentistry, Gum disease, Uncategorized

Habits We Don’t Realize Hurt Our Teeth

TOOTH ENAMEL RANKS between steel and titanium on the Mohs Hardness Scale. That makes it harder than any other substance in the human body, and it also makes it harder than iron! However, it’s still fairly brittle and very vulnerable to acid erosion, and there are plenty of daily habits we might have that can put it at risk.

This One’s a Nail-Biter (But You Shouldn’t Be)

If you ask most people what the harms of a nail-biting habit are, they’ll probably start with ragged, damaged fingernails, but the effects on teeth and overall oral health can be just as serious, if not more so. Tooth enamel might be harder than keratin (what fingernails are made of), which means enamel is going to win the battle, but over time, keratin will win the war.

Habitual nail-biting can erode, crack, and chip teeth. It can shift them out of proper alignment, resulting in gaps and bad bites. It could even lead to root resorption, or the breakdown of the roots of the teeth! The risk of resorption is also higher in someone with braces. At the same time, the fingernails are the dirtiest part of the hands, and all the dirt and germs under there transfers to the mouth in a nail-biting session. This can lead to gum disease.

Avoid Mouth Breathing Whenever Possible

Thanks to the popular show Stranger Things, “Mouth-Breather” has become a more popular insult in recent years, but there are a lot of good reasons to avoid habitually breathing through your mouth instead of your nose. Mouth breathing can cause a variety of problems, both in the short term and over time:

Lower oxygen levels: nose breathing triggers the production of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps our lungs absorb oxygen. Mouth breathing skips that step, so we can’t get as much out of each breath! That results in less energy for mental and physical tasks.

Dry mouth: the constant airflow in the mouth dries it out, which is a big problem, because saliva is the first line of defense against oral bacteria. Dry mouth leads to chronic bad breath and tooth decay.

Sleep apnea: with habitual mouth breathing comes the increased likelihood of sleep apnea, which makes it difficult to get restful sleep and over time increases the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure.

Altered bone growth: when the mouth is closed, the tongue provides the right pressure for a child’s dental arches and facial bones to develop well. Mouth breathing removes the support structure and leads to narrow arches, flat features, drooping eyes, and a small chin.

Worse orthodontic problems: narrow dental arches are very likely to feature a lot of crowding. In order to make room for the full set of teeth, orthodontic treatment will usually be necessary.

Let’s Break Those Habits!

Whether you’re personally struggling with nail biting, mouth breathing, or both, or you’ve noticed that your child does, we can help! Just give us a call. We want you to have all the information you need about the ways these habits impact oral health, and we want you to have all the tools you need to fight back!

We love our patients!

Top image by Flickr user AFSUSA used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

Tooth Whitening: What The ADA Has To Say

Pendleton cosmetic smile makeover

When a cosmetic dentistry procedure becomes popular, it’s natural to want to experience the dramatic results for yourself. However, responsible dental patients should know what the American Dental Association has to say regarding common cosmetic dentistry procedures such as teeth whitening.

The ADA advises patients to communicate with with their dentist before starting any bleaching regimen. An oral examination will help your dentist know if teeth whitening is for you. This is especially critical when you have dark stains on your teeth or multiple crowns and/or fillings.

Once you have agreed on a tooth whitening protocol, your dentist can supervise your use of whichever bleaching agent you have chosen. This will help you get the best results.

You may choose to have your teeth whitened at your dentist’s office. In-office teeth whitening procedures take much less time than at-home whitening, but it’s vital to find out which procedure is right for you.

Also, if you are shopping for whitening tooth products, be sure to look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Along with tooth whitening, there are many other innovative cosmetic dentistry procedures your dentist can recommend. These will help you achieve the brilliant smile you want. These include dental implants, gum contouring, veneers, and more!

Hello. I’m Dr. Dale Behner, a trusted Fishers dentist. I am devoted to oral health, happy patients, and flawless smiles.

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 6599
Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry, Dental Implants, Tooth Whitening

A Patient’s Guide to Finding a Good Dentist

PEOPLE MIGHT NEED to find a new dentist for all sorts of reasons. Maybe they moved to a new city. Maybe their old dentist retired. Maybe they’re new parents and need to find a dentist for their child. Whatever the reason is, we recommend not waiting until an urgent dental health emergency pops up before finding a dentist that fits your needs. Here are five important factors to keep in mind when searching for the best dentist for you.

1. Location, Location, Location!

How close is the practice to your home? To your child’s school or where they play sports? To your workplace? Make sure the distance isn’t so great that making it to twice-yearly checkups will become a major inconvenience. It’s a good idea to decide on a radius that seems doable for you and your family, then determine who the best dentist is within that radius. On the other hand, there might be a dentist slightly farther away who is still worth it for other reasons!

2. Reputation Matters

What kind of reviews does the dentist have? What are their other patients saying about them? Check out the Yelp and Google reviews and maybe ask around your neighborhood, coworkers, and friend group to see if anyone you know is familiar with that particular dentist. While there can sometimes be hidden gems, a lot of good feedback is generally a positive sign.

3. What Specialties Can They Claim?

A dental practice that operates close to you and has fantastic reviews might still not be right for you if they don’t offer some of the services you think you’re likely to need. How good are they with child patients? Do they offer cosmetic treatments? How much experience do they have with root canal therapy or treating gum disease? Do some research into a dentist’s specialties to see if they’re a good fit.

4. How Well Do They Fit Your Budget?

Sometimes a dentist’s only flaw is the cost of their services in comparison to your budget, or that they aren’t in your dental insurance network. It’s still important to find a dentist for regular appointments in this case, because those checkups are much easier on a budget than a serious dental problem that could’ve been caught and treated cheaply in an early stage. Finding a budget-friendly dentist is an excellent investment, both financially and in terms of dental health.

5. Patient Comfort

If you aren’t comfortable around a dentist or within their practice, then the other factors might not matter much to you. It’s a good idea to pay a practice you’re considering an early visit just to get a sense of the place and the staff. A good dentist will always prioritize patient comfort, especially considering how many patients struggle with dental anxiety!

Meanwhile, keep up those oral hygiene habits!

We Look Forward to Meeting You!

If you weren’t sure how to start looking for a great dentist before, we hope we’ve given you a few ideas of where to begin! If you want to learn more about our practice, just give us a call or stop buy. We’re happy to answer any questions you may have!

Thank you for trusting us with your dental health needs!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized
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Dr. Behner and his staff and just the best. They are worth my families 1-hour drive!

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Dr. Behner runs a fantastic and very professional practice. His Dental Hygienist did a wonderful and pain-free cleaning. Always an excellent experience!

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Dr's Behner and Pence provide an outstanding service and I am glad they are my dentist. Their staff is awesome also.

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I know I need some extra pats and such to get me ready, and they always have been there to smile and reassure me! It’s extremely embarrassing to have so much fear but they are there not judging by comforting me!

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Leslee D.

I had put off having dental work because of anxiety. I’m so glad to have been referred to Dr. Behner many years ago. Being able to have IV sedation enabled me to get the work done that was needed. Dr. Behner and his staff are so understanding. My bite is better due to crowns and I’m no longer in pain. Thank you, Dr. Behner. I no longer “dread” the dentist.

—Leslee D.

Cindy M.

My experince with Dr. Behner and staff seriously changed my life. I’m 52, and feared the dentist since childhood, after terrible visits. Over 5 years ago, I found Dr. Behner after doing an internet search for sedation dentistry. At my first visit, even before my sedation appt., I knew I had found my dentist for life. The atmosphere, the staff, and the dentist, all give a sense of comfort and peace. I’ve never once been afraid again, and actually look forward to my appointments!

—Cindy M.

Judy S.

The entire staff is so kind and considerate that over the years my anxiety has diminished. They are my "dental family". Just had an extraction and cannot imagine a better dentist!

—Judy S.

DENTAL CARE TODAY PC -
E. DALE BEHNER DDS

If you are searching for an Indianapolis dentist to provide cosmetic dentistry, sedation dentistry, or dental implants, Dr. E. Dale Behner is here for you! Call today to schedule an appointment if you are in the area, including Fishers and Carmel. Dental Care Today PC - E. Dale Behner DDS
9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, IN 46037
Call: 317-842-2337317-842-2337 DrBehner@dentalcaretoday.com
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