Defeat Bad Breath with a Tongue Scraper

ONE OF THE MAIN things people overlook about a daily oral hygiene routine is cleaning their tongues. That’s right, it doesn’t stop with brushing twice a day for two minutes with a soft-bristled brush and flossing daily. The rough surface of the tongue makes it the perfect place for all kinds of bacteria to hide and build up. Among other things, that bacteria doesn’t help with keeping your breath smelling minty fresh.

Effects of Bacterial Buildup on the Tongue

Bacteria has an easier time building up on our tongues than just about anywhere else on our bodies. (Another germ hotspot is fingernails, which is just one reason we don’t recommend chewing them.) If we aren’t actively cleaning our tongues, harmful bacteria will stay there and multiply, resulting in bad breath and an increased risk of tooth decay on the inner surfaces of our teeth.

Having a lot of bacteria on your tongue can even impact your sense of taste, because it clogs things up and makes it hard for your tastebuds to do their job. Make a habit of cleaning your tongue every day and you might notice that you can enjoy the taste of your favorite foods even better! Finally, bacteria can get in the way of the chemical digestion process that begins as we chew our food. A clean tongue is better at helping the digestive process.

Find a Good Tongue-Scraper

Cleaning your tongue is very easy, but it takes something besides swishing mouthwash, rinsing, or even brushing it with your toothbrush (which mostly just moves bacteria around instead of cleaning it off). All it takes is a couple of passes with a tongue-scraper. You can order one online if there aren’t any at your grocery store by the toothbrushes and floss. They are typically made of plastic or stainless steel, and you can get one with a rough or smooth edge depending on your preference.

When using a tongue-scraper, don’t push hard enough to injure your tongue, but also don’t be alarmed if the first time you use it, it comes away with a lot of weird, smelly gunk. This is the biofilm of bacteria and food particles that builds up over time. It won’t take many days before you should start to notice less and less biofilm coming off on the scraper. That’s a sign that it’s working, so don’t stop!

Want to Learn More about Tongue Cleaning?

If you’re new to tongue cleaning, welcome to the club! We’re happy to answer any questions you have and give you tips if you’re not sure you’re doing it right. We can also recommend good tongue scrapers if you’re not sure which one to get.

It’s an honor to be your trusted dental health professionals!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

A Youthful Smile At Any Age

implant dentures Fishers

Declining health, limited mobility, financial strains – clearly, aging is not for wimps. Though some challenges seniors face can’t be avoided, others can. Dental dilemmas, for instance.

Many dental problems common among retirees such as missing teeth, gum recession, tooth damage, and yellowed enamel, can be remedied.

With modern cosmetic dentistry at Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS, mature men and women can have a fantastic smile that looks as young as they feel (or wish they felt!). Regardless of your age, it is not too late to improve your smile – even if you have some missing teeth.

At Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS in Fishers, we pamper our prized patients. We offer comprehensive general and revolutionary cosmetic dental services including sedation dentistry and dental implants.

If you are looking for a friendly, experienced dentist, call 317-842-2337 to schedule an exam and consultation. You can meet with us about porcelain crowns and veneers, tooth-colored fillings, implant-supported dentures, invisible braces, and teeth whitening.

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

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Posted in Dental Implants, Dentures, Gum disease

What Are Dental Implants?

MODERN DENTISTRY IS incredible. Tooth decay, accidents, and injuries that once would have left someone with a gap in their smile that they could never fill can now be treated so that everything looks and works about as good as new. In many cases, those teeth can even be saved through root canal therapy. When that isn’t possible, dental implants are effective ways to fill in the gaps.

How Implants Compare to False Teeth

Dentures have been a solution for missing teeth for centuries, but they have a few notable flaws. When we use our own teeth to chew, it stimulates the jaw bone and keeps it strong. Dentures aren’t very effective at providing this stimulation, resulting in bone loss in the jaws. This, in turn, can lead to the dentures not fitting very well, so they can slip and fall out easily and leave the gums feeling sore.

Implants, on the other hand, are placed into the jawbone and function the same way as the roots of teeth. Implants greatly reduce the risk of bone loss and they won’t slip and slide while you’re trying to chew your food or have an engaging conversation. You can even brush them the same way as regular teeth! True, the price tag can be higher with implants than dentures, but that’s pretty much the only advantage dentures have.

Different Types of Implants

Dentures come in different types, depending on the needs and budget of the individual patient. Endosteal implants are a great choice for patients with strong, healthy jaws. They consist of titanium posts inserted into the jaw through oral surgery. Once the site has had time to heal, a second surgery follows and a crown that matches the other teeth is placed.

If the patient doesn’t have enough healthy jaw bone to support endosteal implants, they could still benefit from subperiosteal implants. These implants consist of metal frames that the oral surgeon places between the jawbone and the gum tissue. Posts attach to this framework and protrude through the gums so that crowns can be attached.

Implants and Braces?

Braces generally come first for patients who need both orthodontic treatment and implants. Unlike natural teeth, implants won’t move once they’re in place. In some cases, however, an implant can be placed before or during orthodontic treatment so that it can serve as an anchor to help the other teeth move to the desired positions.

Are Implants Right for You?

Millions of Americans get dental implants to fill the gaps in their smiles every year. If you’d like to learn more about this excellent modern solution to an age-old dental problem, we’re happy to answer your questions!

Our favorite smiles are our patients’!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

Do You Want To Change The Shape Of Your Gums?

gum contouring McCordsville

Most dental patients know that cosmetic, restorative and orthodontic dentistry procedures improve the appearance of your smile. There are treatments to reshape teeth, straighten teeth, fix damaged teeth, whiten teeth, and replace missing teeth. But what about your gums? Do you understand how much gum shape adds or detracts from the appearance of your smile?

The shape and size of your gumline can make your teeth appear too large or too small or otherwise out of proportion. Gum contouring can correct gums that appear too low or too high in relation to the teeth and customize them for the perfect smile.

People who are unhappy with their gums might want to examine gum contouring. Many dentists and periodontists offer gum contouring surgery.

This procedure is also called gingival sculpting, gingival contouring or gum graft surgery, but don’t let the term surgery frighten you. Cosmetic gum contouring is performed using a precision laser. The procedure usually involves little pain and requires no recovery time.

Gum reshaping is not always done for purely cosmetic reasons, it is also used to treat gum recession, a common condition that can lead to decay and tooth loss. In gum graft surgery, soft tissue is generally taken either from the roof of the mouth, the area surrounding the site of the grafting, or a tissue bank. Gum grafts applied to exposed tooth roots protect teeth from continuing gum recession and decay and reduce tooth sensitivity. Of course, gum grafts often increase the attractiveness of the smile in the process.

If you are seeking more details about gum contouring, call Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS today at 317-842-2337 to schedule a consultation.

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 6774
Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry, Gum disease, Sedation Dentistry

Your Teeth Are Not Tools!

HUMAN TEETH ARE awesome. We wouldn’t have dedicated our professional lives to working with them if we didn’t think so. There are so many things they can do, from chewing food to providing support for the structure of our faces to facilitating clear speech to being part of our beautiful smiles. Unfortunately, a lot of people try to put their teeth to other uses they weren’t designed for, which can lead to serious problems.

Just Use Scissors or Nail Clippers

We could talk at length about how bad a nail-biting habit is, both for the teeth and the nails, but we’ll keep it short and sweet for now. Fingernails are the least sanitary parts of our hands because it’s so hard to scrub the germs out from under them, and all those germs get into our mouths when we chew our nails. Nail biting also causes a lot of wear and tear to the teeth and can even shift them out of their correct alignment.

We know it’s quick and easy, but resist the impulse to bite through packing tape. It takes a lot more biting pressure to cut through a non-food item like tape than it does to chew actual food. Cutting through tape requires you to grind your teeth, which wears down the chewing surfaces and poses a risk of chipping or fracturing a tooth. It’s bad enough chewing through tape, though; definitely don’t try to cut wire with your teeth.

Just Use a Nutcracker

Trying to crack open nuts with hard shells like walnuts, pecans, or pistachios — or even cracking popcorn kernels — carries a major risk of accidentally cracking or chipping a tooth instead. Teeth that have already had dental work done or have untreated cavities are especially vulnerable to damage. Just use a nutcracker!

Just Use a Bottle Opener

Just because tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the body doesn’t mean it’s up to the task of popping a metal lid off a bottle. Enamel might be hard, but it’s also very brittle. Using our teeth to open bottles is a great way to damage them, and if we slip, we could also damage the soft tissues of our lips or gums. It’s just not worth it.

Just Set It Down

It might seem convenient to hold a pencil, some nails, or a few sewing pins in your mouth until your hands are free, but this can have some scary unintended consequences. What if you trip? What if you get caught off-guard by a sudden hiccup or yawn? There are cases of people choking on or swallowing things they only meant to hold in their mouths for a few seconds. But even if an accident never happens, these objects can still wear down the teeth.

Use Your Teeth for Teeth Things Only!

The third-highest cause of tooth loss is cracking and fracturing, so don’t put your teeth at risk by using them for things they weren’t designed to do! You’ll save yourself an emergency dental visit and expensive repairs by sticking to using your teeth for chewing and talking. Also make sure to keep up the daily flossing, twice-daily brushing with a soft-bristled brush, and twice-yearly dental visits!

Our patients have the best smiles!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
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What’s the Difference Between Silver Fillings and White Fillings?

white tooth fillings Fishers

In today’s post, we discuss fillings.

What is a composite filling?

Composite fillings are comprised of a mixture of glass or quartz and resin which results in a natural tooth-colored material. They are extremely durable when bonded to the tooth with adhesive.

What is an amalgam filling?

Amalgam fillings are also called “silver fillings” though they aren’t 100% silver. Dental amalgam is about 50% mercury with some silver, tin, and copper. Mercury creates a durable compound with the other metals. This type of filling has been used to fill cavities in teeth since 1895.

Are amalgam fillings dangerous?

Some people claim that mercury fillings are linked to chronic disease. In fact, some dentists (known as “holistic” or “mercury free”) have established practices around replacing amalgam fillings with composite fillings. However, many respected medical and scientific associations have long indicated that amalgam fillings are safe. This includes the American Dental Association, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Mayo Clinic, and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

This is from the International Journal of Dentistry:

1) Mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects

2) Allergic reactions to mercury from dental amalgam restorations have been demonstrated, but these are extremely rare

3) Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of dental amalgam use from clinical practice or the replacement with other single-tooth restorative dental materials

(Source: Uçar Y, Brantley WA. Section 5. Conclusions:  Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams. Int J Dent 2011;2011:981595. doi:10.1155/2011/981595. Accessed April 5, 2016.)

Do you have a son or daughter with amalgam fillings and are stressed about safety? Schedule a consultation with Dr. Behner to discuss your concerns.

Is a composite filling the same as a white filling?

Yes, informally. The term “white filling” has become a descriptive term. Composite fillings are made to look identical to the patient’s tooth color. Compared to amalgam fillings–which don’t match the color of teeth–they are whitish, white with a slight yellow tint, or white with a slight gray tint depending on the color of the tooth.

What’s the difference between composite fillings and amalgam fillings?

As discussed previously, these fillings are constructed with different materials. Composite fillings have the advantage of blending seamlessly with the tooth. In some settings–such as a large cavity in a molar–an amalgam filling may be considered. Keep in mind that a composite filling has proved to be a stable restoration.

Are amalgam fillings still used?

Despite the popularity of tooth-colored fillings, some Indianapolis dentists still find amalgam fillings best for some situations. Unfortunately, some dental insurance providers and state Medicaid plans don’t cover composite fillings.

Do you have more questions about fillings?

Call Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS at the number below!

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

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Posted in General Dental, Mercury-free, Mercury-free fillings

Hypodontia and Supernumerary Teeth

WHILE A COMPLETE SET of baby teeth only includes 20 teeth, adults usually end up with between 28 and 32 teeth. Why the range? Well, not everyone gets all four wisdom teeth. Plenty of people don’t get any at all! Many of us who do get wisdom teeth need them removed because we don’t have room for them. However, in rare cases, a person could end up with extra teeth beyond the 32, or they could have fewer than 28!

An Extra Toothy Smile: Supernumerary Teeth

Hyperdontia is a condition where extra teeth (referred to as “supernumerary teeth”) develop in the jaw. This condition is less common with baby teeth than adult teeth, and we don’t fully understand what causes it. A leading theory is that it could be the result of a tooth bud dividing, resulting in two teeth instead of the usual one.

The extra teeth don’t always look like normal teeth. They could be peg or cone shaped, have multiple cusps, or just be lumps of dental tissue. No matter what their shape is, there usually isn’t room for them. They can remain impacted in the gums, where they cause crowding and alignment problems, and if they do manage to erupt, they may still cause these issues.

Gaps: Congenitally Missing Teeth

Hypodontia is a condition where fewer than the full set of teeth develops (not counting wisdom teeth). Like hyperdontia, hypodontia is more common in adult teeth than baby teeth, but it still only affects around 5% of the population. The teeth most likely to be affected are the second lower premolars, followed by the upper lateral incisors, with the upper second premolars coming in third.

Missing incisors or premolars can lead to difficulties with chewing, shifting in the surrounding teeth, bone loss in the jaw, and even loss of the surrounding teeth. The causes of this condition are not well understood, though genetics do play a role. Hypodontia may also occur in conjunction with another genetic disorder like Down syndrome, cleft palate, or ectodermal dysplasia.

Here’s a quick review of the normal set of adult teeth:

Treating Missing and Extra Teeth

Typically, when extra teeth are present and there isn’t room for them, the solution is extraction. The trickier issue to solve is congenitally missing teeth. Each case is different, and the best option for one patient will be different than for another. Sometimes, if the baby tooth hasn’t fallen out, it can simply act as the permanent tooth as long as it stays healthy. Sometimes orthodontic treatment can close the gap between the existing teeth.

The gap can also be widened to make room for removable partial dentures, dental bridges, or even permanent dental implants. Partial dentures can be attached to a retainer or anchored to the surrounding teeth. Bridges are similar, but instead of being removable, they are cemented in place. Implants function like normal teeth, with a post fixed in the jaw bone and a crown that matches the natural teeth on top.

Let Us Check Out Those Teeth!

Regular dental appointments are the best way to catch cases of hypodontia or supernumerary teeth so that we can make a plan for the best way to address the issue. But whether you have the regular number of teeth or not, don’t forget to keep brushing twice a day and flossing daily! If you’d like to know more about these unusual conditions or if you have any concerns about your own dental health, just give us a call!

We look forward to seeing you at our practice!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

Think It’s Not Necessary To Replace Missing Back Teeth?

dental implants Fishers

Some men and women who lose a posterior tooth question whether to replace it. After all, it doesn’t show when you smile and there are other teeth to take over the chewing functions. Why not avert the expense to replace it and save some money? Actually, there are several important reasons to replace a back tooth with a tooth implant if possible:

1. The adjacent tooth (or teeth) may start shifting.

If a tooth tips, moves or rotates, it can impact the bite. The unopposed tooth can also move, though it generally moves outward from the bone (over-eruption). Teeth that are displaced can become more vulnerable to gum disease, decay, or TMJ pain.

2. The underlying bone will eventually loosen.

Without the tooth root, the jaw bone pulls back. This changes the shape of the face and gives it a sunk-in look due to a decrease in supporting bone. The vertical shortening progresses and becomes more pronounced as you get older.

3. There will be increased stress on the teeth that take over the chewing functions.

This can bring about excessive wear, fracture, or pain.

If you have a missing posterior tooth and want to learn about dental implants, call Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS at 317-842-2337 to schedule an appointment.

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

ArticleID 7768
Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry, Dental Implants, General Dental

Tooth Anatomy 101

HOW MUCH DO you know about what’s on the inside of your teeth? Let’s take a quick look! We feel that the more our patients know about the structure and anatomy of teeth, the better they will understand how to take good care of them and how important that is. Let’s start at the roots and then move up to the crown.

The Roots of Our Teeth

Our teeth are connected to our jaws by the long roots beneath the gums. The roots are held in place and cushioned by the periodontal membrane between them and the surrounding bone. In addition to being shielded from harmful bacteria by the gum tissue, roots have built-in armor called cementum, a hard, calcified substance that coats their surfaces. The tip of each root ends in a tiny hole through which blood vessels and nerves can access the inside of the tooth.

The Layers of a Tooth’s Crown

The crown is the portion of the tooth that we can see above the gums, and it is made of three layers. At the core is the pulp chamber, which is where the blood vessels and nerves from the roots go. This is what makes a tooth alive and why we can feel the temperature of our food and drinks in our teeth, or pain when something is wrong. Keep in mind that tooth pain is a warning sign and a good cue to see the dentist!

Surrounding the pulp is the dentin, which is essentially bone. This layer is naturally somewhat yellowish in color and thicker in adult teeth than baby teeth, which is why there is often a contrast in color between a child’s new adult teeth and the surrounding baby teeth! Microscopic tubules run all throughout the dentin, which is how the nerves in the dental pulp can feel temperature changes.

The outermost layer of our teeth is the protective enamel layer. Enamel is mostly made of inorganic hydroxyapatite crystals, and it is the strongest substance in the body. We’d have a hard time using it to chew our food if it wasn’t! Because it is inorganic, though, enamel can’t repair or replace itself when it is eroded or damaged. That’s where good daily brushing and flossing habits, cutting down on acidic foods and drinks, and regular dental visits come in!

Let’s Keep Teeth Healthy from Crown to Root!

From enamel to pulp, roots to supportive periodontal structures, every part of the tooth and surrounding tissue is important to good dental health. Keep up the good brushing and flossing, and make sure to keep scheduling regular appointments with the dentist!

We love seeing our patients’ smiles!

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.
Posted in Uncategorized

Gently Now (Protect Your Gums When You Brush)

cosmetic dentistry Fishers

Everyone wants nice, pearly whites so, naturally, we should brush our teeth more, right? The only problem with that is many individuals brush their teeth too aggressively, leading to gum recession.  You don’t want that.

Gum recession is when your gum line exposes more of your teeth, or in severe cases, your tooth root. It leads to a pocket of space between your teeth and gum line.  Decay-causing bacteria can grow and fester in that pocket. This leads to serious issues down the line. Even tooth loss.

Longer or Harder?

A common fallacy we hear occasionally at Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS is the idea that if you want to brighten your teeth, you should scrub them really hard.

The best way to get pearly whites (and prevent tooth decay) is to brush longer, not harder. Gently brush your teeth until they’re squeaky clean. Run your tongue over them. Doesn’t that feel great?

When you are finished brushing, it’s time to floss. Make sure you get the floss into the pocket between the teeth.

Why?

Brushing longer and not harder is the key. When you brush your teeth quickly, you may not be getting all the fragments of food off. You don’t want the particles of food to turn into plaque.

If you truly desire whiter teeth, make sure you brush your teeth in slow, circular motion for as close to five minutes as you can. Methodically go over each tooth on every surface. Plus your tongue. If five minutes is impossible, make sure you brush for at least two minutes. Set a timer on your phone. Play your favorite two-minute song.

Use a whitening toothpaste with fluoride. That way, you get all the recent gunk off and your teeth get a little bit whiter each time you brush. And the fluoride helps your teeth remineralize after eating or drinking enamel-weakening acidic foods and beverages.

Let’s Review

If you’re not careful, the way you brush your teeth can lead to gum recession. Gum recession can (and most likely will) cause a space to form between your teeth and gum line. This pocket collects bacteria. Bacteria causes tooth decay. Plus, if the gums continue to recede, the tooth can become loose.

Next, we discussed the proper motion and duration to brush your teeth. Finally, we went over the reasoning behind why all the aforementioned things are so important. Remember, you want a slow, circular motion for two to five minutes.

What If You Already Have Gum Recession?

Come talk to us at Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS. We can discuss your options for reversing it.

What If You Want Your Teeth Whiter Than Whitening Toothpaste Can Make Them?

Whitening toothpaste can make your teeth a shade or two lighter. Professional in-office teeth whitening can make your teeth several shades whiter. In one visit, you can have a sensational white smile.

 

 

Contact Dental Care Today PC – E. Dale Behner DDS:

317-842-2337

Location (Tap to open in Google Maps):

9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, Indiana
46037

 

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Posted in Cosmetic Dentistry, Gum disease, Oral Health
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Harry B.

Dr. Behner and his staff and just the best. They are worth my families 1-hour drive!

—Harry B.

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Dr. Behner runs a fantastic and very professional practice. His Dental Hygienist did a wonderful and pain-free cleaning. Always an excellent experience!

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Dr's Behner and Pence provide an outstanding service and I am glad they are my dentist. Their staff is awesome also.

—Pat S.

Jeanie M.

I know I need some extra pats and such to get me ready, and they always have been there to smile and reassure me! It’s extremely embarrassing to have so much fear but they are there not judging by comforting me!

—Jeanie M.

Leslee D.

I had put off having dental work because of anxiety. I’m so glad to have been referred to Dr. Behner many years ago. Being able to have IV sedation enabled me to get the work done that was needed. Dr. Behner and his staff are so understanding. My bite is better due to crowns and I’m no longer in pain. Thank you, Dr. Behner. I no longer “dread” the dentist.

—Leslee D.

Cindy M.

My experince with Dr. Behner and staff seriously changed my life. I’m 52, and feared the dentist since childhood, after terrible visits. Over 5 years ago, I found Dr. Behner after doing an internet search for sedation dentistry. At my first visit, even before my sedation appt., I knew I had found my dentist for life. The atmosphere, the staff, and the dentist, all give a sense of comfort and peace. I’ve never once been afraid again, and actually look forward to my appointments!

—Cindy M.

Judy S.

The entire staff is so kind and considerate that over the years my anxiety has diminished. They are my "dental family". Just had an extraction and cannot imagine a better dentist!

—Judy S.

DENTAL CARE TODAY PC -
E. DALE BEHNER DDS

If you are searching for an Indianapolis dentist to provide cosmetic dentistry, sedation dentistry, or dental implants, Dr. E. Dale Behner is here for you! Call today to schedule an appointment if you are in the area, including Fishers and Carmel. Dental Care Today PC - E. Dale Behner DDS
9744 Lantern Rd
Fishers, IN 46037
Call: 317-842-2337317-842-2337 DrBehner@dentalcaretoday.com
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